BS in Criminal Justice & Criminology (with or without emphasis in Cybercrime)

Georgia Southern University
Degree Level Bachelors
Total Credit Hours 124

Program Description

With a bachelor of science degree in Criminal Justice and Criminology, you’ll gain the education you need to get started in a variety of careers in victim advocacy, law enforcement, probation and parole, corrections, law, data analyses, and digital forensics. The enriching curriculum provides a broad education on crime, the causes of criminal behavior, juvenile delinquency, victimology, and the criminal justice system.

Criminal Justice and Criminology Degree Emphasis

By emphasizing in criminal justice and criminology, you’ll receive focused training in the fundamentals of the American criminal justice system, legal processes from arrest through appeal, investigative procedures, and the factors leading to criminal behavior. You’ll build an invaluable foundation of knowledge of crime, including victimology, juvenile justice, gang-related crimes, drugs and society, violence and issues in homeland security.

Cybercrime Degree Emphasis

With a degree emphasis in cybercrime, you’ll specialize in criminal justice efforts to combat computer-oriented crimes. The program explores computer and cybercrime scene investigation and analysis techniques, computer forensics, online economic fraud, cyber harassment and stalking, exploitation and cyber terrorism.

Careers in Criminal Justice

  • Probation and parole officer
  • Domestic violence counselor
  • Forensic science technician
  • Loss prevention specialist
  • Local and state police
  • Criminal investigator
  • Computer forensics
  • Homeland security
  • Advocacy and law
  • Correction officer
  • Federal agencies
  • Private security
  • Legal offices
  • Caseworker
  • Detective

Admissions Information

See https://www.georgiasouthern.edu/admissions/ for all admissions categories.

Adult & Non-Traditional Freshmen

Acceptance is based on the following criteria:

  • Have been out of high school at least five years or high school class graduated at least five years ago.
  • Hold a high school diploma from an accredited or approved high school as specified in the Board of Regents policy section 402.0101 or have satisfactorily completed the GED, HiSET, or TASC.
  • Have earned between zero (0) and 29 transferable semester credit hours.
  • Have a 2.0 or higher on all attempted college work.*

Upon admission, you may be required to take the ACCUPLACER test, a computerized placement test that measures skills in math, reading, and writing. Contact the Academic Success Center to schedule a time to take the test. The ACCUPLACER must be completed prior to enrollment. Contact the Academic Success Center for more details.

Adult & Non-Traditional Transfers

Most adult transfer students are actually admitted as a regular transfer student. Learn more about transfer admissions here.

Acceptance is based on the following criteria:

  • Have been out of high school at least five years or high school class graduated at least five years ago.
  • Hold a high school diploma from an accredited or approved high school as specified in the Board of Regents policy section 402.0101 or have satisfactorily completed the GED, HiSET, or TASC.
  • Have earned 30+ transferable semester credit hours.
  • Have a 2.0 or higher on all attempted college work.*

*If you have under a 2.0 on all attempted college work, you may contact our office to discuss additional options.

If you have been out of college for five or more years, we strongly recommend that you contact the Academic Success Center to learn more about the services provided to help you succeed in college.

Transfer and spring/fall transient students who have taken remedial, learning support, and/or required high school curriculum make-up courses in college must:

  • Exit those courses successfully, and
  • Earn credit for Area A equivalent courses that correspond to the mandated remedial/learning support courses with a “C” or higher.

Program Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges